My Simmons

Learning Communities

Spring 2022

1. FRANCE AND ITS CULTURAL LEGACY (8 credits)

The art world experienced a radical shift during the latter part of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Paris was at the center of this revolution as artists, musicians, and writers forged together new styles in the neighborhoods of Montmartre and Montparnasse. France and Its Cultural Legacy will explore the ways in which creators working in different disciplines influenced each other to bring about the birth of the modern world.

MUS-239-LC Music that Changed the World

Greg Slowik (3 credits) (SH)
T 11:00 – 12:50

Looking for new means of self-expression, musicians, artists and writers rejected traditional forms and methods of creativity in Paris at the turn of the 20th century. Our study includes these explosive new ways of creating music, art and literature that changed the world forever. Topics include Debussy, Impressionism, Ravel, musical influences of the exotic, Stravinsky and the Ballets Russes. Taught in English.

FREN-310M-LC Inside France: Studies in French Culture

Eduardo Febles (3 credits) (GC)
M 9:00 – 10:50

An in-depth exploration of the cultural history of France from the French Revolution to World War I with emphasis on Paris as the capital of the art and literary movements of the 19th century. Topics covered include the transformation of Paris during the Second Empire, Impressionism and its lasting effects on French culture, colonialism and representations of the exotic. Readings from Claire de Duras, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, and Apollinaire. Taught in English.

LCIS-201-01 Integrative Seminar: France and its Cultural Legacy

Slowik, Febles (2 credits)
W 9:00 – 10:20

The integrative seminar will bring together music, art, and literature to illustrate how these different but related disciplines were in constant dialogue throughout the 19th and 20th centuries in France. The seminar will include virtual visits to French museums (such as the Louvre and the Musée d’Orsay) and monuments (such as the Notre-Dame Cathedral). We will also attend virtual concerts and ballet performances produced by world-renowned Parisian venues (such as the Palais Garnier and the Paris Opera Ballet).

2. CODING AND DIGITAL STORIES (8 credits)

This Learning Community takes an interdisciplinary approach to digital storytelling and introductory programming. Students work individually and in teams to produce an interactive story that will include elements such as short-form video documentaries or historical narratives, accompanying audio pieces, photography, and a story script – all based on solid storytelling techniques. Students will gain a foundation in coding basics using Python, which also serves as the entrance to Computer Science.

COMM-250-LC The Interactive Story

Kris Erickson (3 credits) (ALA)
T 6:00 – 7:50 PM

In this course, students use digital media to create interactive stories in multiple spaces – both online and through engagement with urban space. Students will research a specific location-based story and create a set of multimedia narratives for the Internet that engages users in a walking tour.

CS-112-LC Introduction to Computer Science & CS-112L-LC1 Computer Lab

Denise Carroll (3 credits) (SCI)
CS-112-LC1 Lecture: M 6:00 – 7:50 PM
CS-112L-LC1 Lab: T 9:30 – 10:50

Students will learn basic skills in developing software applications: variables, decision and repetition structures, data structures and modular programming. They will also learn the basics of building web sites, including HTML, CSS, and responsive web design.
(NOTE: Make sure to select the sections with DENISE CARROLL, not Margaret Menzin.)

LCIS-201-03: Coding and Digital Stories

Erickson, Carroll (2 credits)
W 6:00 – 7:20 PM

Students will use skills learned in both courses to create a multimedia, location-based story with elements of adventure. Using lived experiences, storytelling techniques and basic media skills learned in The Interactive Story, combined with computer skills gained in Intro to Computer Science, students will develop an interactive walking tour.

3. COMMUNITY FOOD SYSTEMS (8 credits)

This Learning Community addresses the central question of what policies and practices are needed to develop sustainable and just community food systems. The LC offers an interdisciplinary approach to examining community food systems with particular emphasis on urban areas, using Boston as an example. We examine the many ways food shapes urban sustainability, public health, community, and economic development. We also consider federal, state, and municipal food policies along with urban planning initiatives for community-based food systems.

POLS-227-LC Food Policy

Kristina Pechulis (3 credits) (SH)
T 9:00 -10:50

This course examines food policy issues and how the government and the food industry influence what and how much we eat. We look at introductory food policy concepts, including how laws, regulations, and decisions and actions of governments influence food production, distribution, and consumption.

ECON-235-LC From Farm to Table: The Political Economy of Food Systems

Carole Biewener (3 credits) (SH)
M 9:00 – 10:50

This course provides a political economy approach to the study of food systems. Using New England and Boston as examples of regional and urban food systems, we follow the food chain, from farms and factories, to food service and restaurants. We pay particular attention to the work involved in producing and providing food, with an eye to understanding the racialized and gendered divisions of labor at play and the unequal distribution of benefits and burdens within the food system. Throughout we compare the conventional, industrial food system to alternative regional and local food system initiatives that seek to establish more socially just and environmentally sustainable food systems.

LCIS-201-04 Integrative Seminar: Community Food Systems

Biewener, Pechulis (2 credits)
W 9:00- 10:20

The integrative seminar will serve as an incubator lab for students to develop proposals for projects that would contribute to creating a more sustainable and just community food system – at Simmons, in the greater Boston area, or elsewhere. In order to accomplish this, students need to understand and consider the interplay of social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental issues as they relate to food systems.

4. CARIBBEAN HISTORY AND CULTURE (8 credits)

This Caribbean History and Culture Learning Community combines a historical overview of the region with a deep dive into the literature of the Francophone Caribbean. Introducing students to an area of the globe that is often considered marginal to world events, we will explore the Caribbean’s significant global impact. Topics include (but are not limited to) plantation slavery and its relationship to the dawn of global capitalism, the Haitian Revolution, emancipation, Black-pride cultural and political movements, nationalism and independence, women’s resistance, emmigration, and the multiplicity of Caribbean identities.

FREN-235-LC Francophone Caribbean Cultures Through Literature

Marda Messay (3 credits) (GC)
TH 9:00 -10:50

This course exposes students to some key works of the Francophone Caribbean and provides students with an insight into the diversity and complexity of Francophone Caribbean cultures and into topics like race, class, identity, gender, state violence.

HIST-217-LC Caribbean History

Frances Sullivan (3 credits) (GC)
W 9:00 – 10:50

This course provides an overview of Caribbean history from Columbus through today. It explores how conquest and colonialism, slavery and emancipation, independence struggles, neo-imperialism, and environmental disaster have shaped this diverse region today, and how the region has shaped the wider world, paying particular attention to the lives of marginalized women and men.

LCIS-201-05 Integrative Seminar: The Global Caribbean

Messay, Sullivan (2 credits)
F 9:00- 10:20

In this interdisciplinary literature and history seminar, students will read texts that illuminate the Caribbean’s role in world events and global cultures. We will explore revolution that had major world impacts (eg; Haiti and Cuba), migration to Europe and North America, and cultural phenomena such as négritude and creolité and their influence on transnational oppositional politics, and other Caribbean developments that have reverberated across the globe.

5. SKILLS FOR BUSINESS SUCCESS (8 credits)

This course focuses on the interfaces between organizational behavior and management accounting by taking a contemporary approach to understanding how people behave in organizations and the financial decision-making required to succeed. Topics covered include human behaviors within organizations, managerial problem-solving and decision-making, communication skills, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and break-even analysis. The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester-long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.

BUS-234-LC Organization Communication and Behavior

Mary Shapiro (3 credits) (SH)
M 9:00 – 10:50

Organizational Behavior (OB) is the systematic study, and the careful application of knowledge about how people think and behave within organizations. In successful organizations, leaders competently manage and organize a complex system of personalities, talent, teamwork and resources to meet strategic objectives. This course takes a contemporary approach to the interdisciplinary study of human behavior within organizations. It combines social science and psychology theories with practical workplace applications in an analytical framework that explores individual, interpersonal, and system-wide dynamics. Throughout the semester you will gain insight into your strengths as an individual, team-member, and leader; identify areas for personal improvement; and hone your managerial problem-solving and decision-making skills.

ACCT-120-LC Managerial Accounting

Divya Khaitan (3 credits)
T 9:00 -10:50

This course focuses on the interfaces between organizational behavior and management accounting by taking a contemporary approach to understanding how people behave in organizations and the financial decision-making required to succeed. Topics covered include human behaviors within organizations, managerial problem-solving and decision-making, communication skills, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and break-even analysis. The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester-long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.

LCIS-201-06 Integrative Seminar: Skills for Business Success

Shapiro, Khaitan (2 credits)
W 9:00 – 10:20

The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester-long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.

6. A WAY TO UNDERSTAND DISEASE (8 credits)

“A Way to Understand Disease” combines the newest insights into disease available from studying microbes – both good and bad – with the power of computer science to examine huge amounts of data easily. This Learning Community is for anyone interested in the current pandemic and its possible evolution. We’ll use cutting-edge databases to address biological questions about emerging pandemics and the evolution of disease. In the integrative seminar, we’ll connect these two areas: how computer methods are used to reassemble the entire viral genome of the COVID-19 virus, and how computers help scientists and doctors solve the mysteries of disease.

BIOL-200-LC The Human Microbiome and Disease

Jennifer Canfield (3 credits) (SCI)
W 9:00 – 10:50 AM

Prerequisite: BIOL-113  (Note: students who have not completed BIOL-113 may still receive consent to take the LC. Email [email protected] and [email protected] for more information.)
This course is an interdisciplinary science experience that explores the microorganisms that live in our bodies and how they affect human biology. Using modern chemical, biological, mathematical theory, and bioinformatics tools we will illustrate core topics in general biology, genetics, microbiology, and biochemistry through the human microbiome.

CS-112-LC2 Introduction to Computer Science & CS-112L-LC2 Computer Lab

Margaret Menzin (3 credits) (QL)
CS-112-LC2 Lecture: TH 9:00 – 10:50
CS-112L-LC2 Lab: TH 12:30 – 1:50

This course provides an introduction to computing in python, but with an emphasis on the problems that are important in bioinformatics (such as pattern matching and looking for DNA sequences which are of biological interest.) This course may be used as a prerequisite for any course which has CS 112 as a prerequisite.
(NOTE: Make sure to select CS-112L-LC12 with MARGARET MENZIN, not the -LC1 lab.)

LCIS-201-07 Integrative Seminar: A Way to Understand Disease

Canfield, Menzin (2 credits)
TH 9:30 – 10:50

We will use tools from both courses to answer biological questions about molecular evolution and the impact it has on the development of the body’s microbial community.  We’ll look at how the “healthy” bacteria in your body help you and how the “dangerous” ones harm you.  And we’ll use some cutting edge databases to ask questions like “What is it about mutations in the COVID-19 virus that make it more dangerous than other viruses?”  And, finally, the integrative seminar connects these two areas: how computer methods are used to reassemble the entire viral genome of the COVID-19 virus, and how computers help scientists and doctors solve the mysteries of disease.

7. TELLING STORIES WITH DATA (8 credits)

This Learning Community seeks to explore different tools and lenses for understanding data and how to use it to understand some of our main societal challenges including inequality and climate change. Data and Economic Development will introduce theory, tools, concepts, and techniques for understanding these issues from a global / macroeconomic perspective. Data as Art will focus on a more individual and subjective perspective, using artistic tools to explore and represent how each student can connect their own experience to these larger issues. The Integrative Seminar will use several datasets to synthesize these two perspectives with the goal of producing useful interpretations and compelling narratives.

ECON-290-LC Economic Development by the Numbers (Special Topics in Econ)

Niloufer Sohrabji (3 credits)
M 9:00 – 10:50

This course introduces economic development challenges and policy options facing developing and developed countries. The course will survey a history of development thought and the indicators used to measure development (poverty, inequality, economic growth, sustainable development). Using data we will analyze the development experience of various countries to address the following questions: why do some countries achieve a high level of development and others lag behind? How important are institutions and geography in determining development outcomes? What is the role of government and globalization in achieving development?

ART-231-LC Data as Art: The Personal and the Political (Special Topics in Art)

Michael Zachary (3 credits) (ALA)
T 9:00 – 10:50

A growing number of contemporary artists work with data to create personal and political narratives. This class functions as both a brief survey of the history of data driven art and as a hands on workshop students will learn to use the techniques and concepts commonly used in data driven art to help them visualize information in the form of images and use these images to create compelling narratives. Special attention will be paid to concepts such as self-surveillance, personal data collection, and strategies for small scale crowdsourcing that emphasize surfacing and amplifying personal and communal narratives over larger macro perspectives.

LCIS-201-08 Integrative Seminar: From Numbers to Narrative

Sohrabji, Zachary (2 credits)
W 9:00 – 10:20

In this course we aim to learn the tools to ask the right questions using different data sets, focusing on the central question “How do we make connections between our own personal and communal experience and the larger macro forces that shape our societies. We use a case-study approach examining inequality, climate change, personal consumption and choices, etc. Through this, students will learn how to describe and communicate (oral, visual, written) what the data shows and (equally importantly) how it can help us reimagine our shared future.

8. NUTRITION AND HEALTH PROMOTION – FOR 8-SEM. NURSING STUDENTS (8 credits)

This Learning Community will explore factors associated with the promotion of health of individuals and communities, with a special emphasis on how nutrition can promote optimal health and prevent disease. The Health Promotion course will examine all factors and behavior choices that promote optimal health and prevent disease. The Nutrition portion will provide a foundation in nutrition science with special emphasis on nutrients/diets that promote health throughout the lifecycle. The integrated seminar includes a service-learning component working with Boston-based community organizations.

NURS-229-LC Nursing Health Promotion

Instructor: TBD (3 credits) (GC)
NURS-229-LC1: T 9:00 – 10:50
NURS-229-LC2: TH 9:00 – 10:50
NURS-229-LC3: TH 9:00 – 10:50
NURS-229-LC4: TH 9:00 – 10:50

An overview of theoretical concepts related to health promotion and disease prevention. Students will gain skills and knowledge in assisting individuals in making choices that promote health and wholeness. There is an emphasis on wellness, prevention, health promotion and health education as well as a focus on populations and their environment as a unit of service. Fulfills NURS 229.

NUTR-112-LC Nutrition for the Health Professions

Instructor: TBD (3 credits)
NUTR-112-LC1: TH 9:00 – 10:50
NUTR-112-LC2: T 9:00 – 10:50
NUTR-112-LC3: TH 1:00 – 2:50
NUTR-112-LC4: T 9:00 – 10:50

This course provides a foundation in nutrition science, with a special emphasis on nutrition principles in health promotion and disease prevention. It provides an overview of the functions of the nutrients, their requirements in the body and effects on health and nutritional needs during different stages of life. It also covers principles of nutrition and diet in the prevention of disease complications.

LCIS-201-(09 – 12) Integrative Seminar: Health Promotion and Nutrition

Instructors: TBD (2 credits)
LCIS-201-09: T 11:00 – 12:20
LCIS-201-10: TH 11:00 – 12:20  
LCIS-201-11: T 3:00 – 4:20 
LCIS-201-12: TH 11:00 – 12:20  

The integrative seminar will have an applied focus, through the use of case studies. These will promote critical thinking, and problem solving skills using real life scenarios in which students will develop health promotion strategies using the principles learned in courses 1 and 2.


Fall 2021

1. Newton’s Insights: Integrated Physics And Calculus (10 credits)

In these meetings we will use calculus to solve fundamental problems in physics, such as simple harmonic motion, planetary motion, and calculating moments of inertia. The insights we get from very real world physics also help to bolster our understanding of the fundamental calculus processes of differentiation and integration. The two subjects are intrinsically linked, and studying them together makes each one easier. **NOTE: This is a 10-credit Learning Community.

MATH-121-LC Calculus II

Brown (4 credits) (QL KCA)
T/TH 9:00 – 10:50 am
Prerequisite: MATH 120 or equivalent.
Covers integral calculus and applications to area, volume, etc., transcendental functions, techniques of integration, polar coordinates, and improper integrals.

PHYS-114-LC Fundamentals of Physics I (Lecture)

P. Jason White (4 credits) (SCI KCA)
M/W 9:00 – 9:50 am
First course in Physics for science majors (calculus based). Concentrates on the subjects of mechanics: motion, mass, force, energy, momentum, and torque and static equilibrium. Additional material includes fluids and simple harmonic motion. Three hours of lecture, a one-hour, guided-inquiry learning session and a three hour lab per week.

Fundamentals of Physics (Lab)
Students will register for one of the following lab sections:

  • PHYS-112L-LC, F 11:00 – 1:50 (White)

Please note that this is the designated lab section for the Learning Community. Requests to enroll in other lab sections will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

LCIS-201-01 Integrative Seminar: Newton’s Insights

Brown, White (2 credits)
F 9:30 – 10:50 am
In this seminar we will use the abstraction of calculus to solve physics problems and reinforce our understanding of physics, and will use the physical insights of physics to bolster our understanding of calculus. It is not an accident that Newton invented freshman calculus in order to formulate freshman physics. Following in his footsteps, we will use each subject to support our understanding of the other.

2. Surveillance In Modern America (8 credits)

This Learning Community uses the War on Drugs and the War on Terror to investigate the modern history and consequences of surveillance in America. In doing so, the course examines the rhetoric and politics used to promote surveillance, the different policies and tools that make up its application, and the impact that increased levels of surveillance have had on American society. Using the unique but occasionally overlapping histories and consequences of these two wars, the course will emphasize the intersection of American surveillance with the social dimensions of race, class, ethnicity, religion, and gender.

POLS-228-LC The War on Drugs

Rosenthal (3 credits) (SH KCA)
M 9:00 – 10:50 am
This course explores the War on Drugs that has been waged in the United States over the last fifty years. In doing so, it focuses on the history and development of the war, considers its various consequences, evaluates its effectiveness, and analyzes current reform efforts.

SOCI-233-LC The War on Terror

Selod (3 credits) (GC KCA)
T 9:00 – 10:50 am
This course examines the history and impact of the War on Terror in the United States and globally. The course will examine the cultural, political and economic motivations for the War on Terror and the impact it has had on communities of color in the United States.

LCIS-201-02-LC Integrative Seminar: Surveillance in Modern America

Rosenthal, Selod (2 credits)
W 9:00 – 10:20 am
This integrative seminar will compare and contrast the histories, consequences, and reform efforts of the surveillance involved in these two wars. In doing so, it will emphasize how these wars have cut across dimensions of race, class, ethnicity, religion, and gender.

3. Skills For Business Success (8 credits)

This course focuses on the interfaces between organizational behavior and management accounting by taking a contemporary approach to understanding how people behave in organizations and the financial decision-making required to succeed. Topics covered include human behaviors within organizations, managerial problem-solving and decision-making, communication skills, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and break-even analysis. The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.

BUS-234-LC Organization Communication and Behavior

Shapiro (3 credits) (SH KCA)
M 6:00 – 7:50 pm
Organizational Behavior (OB) is the systematic study, and the careful application of knowledge about how people think and behave within organizations. In successful organizations, leaders competently manage and organize a complex system of personalities, talent, teamwork and resources to meet strategic objectives. This course takes a contemporary approach to the interdisciplinary study of human behavior within organizations. It combines social science and psychology theories with practical workplace applications in an analytical framework that explores individual, interpersonal, and system-wide dynamics. Throughout the semester you will gain insight into your strengths as an individual, team-member, and leader; identify areas for personal improvement; and hone your managerial problem-solving and decision-making skills.

ACCT-120-LC Managerial Accounting

TBA (3 credits) (QL)
T 6:00 -7:50 pm
This course focuses on the interfaces between organizational behavior and management accounting by taking a contemporary approach to understanding how people behave in organizations and the financial decision-making required to succeed. Topics covered include human behaviors within organizations, managerial problem-solving and decision-making, communication skills, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and break-even analysis. The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.

LCIS-201-03 Integrative Seminar: Skills for Business Success

Shapiro, TBA (2 credits)
W 6:00 – 7:20 pm
The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester-long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.

4. Crime And Punishment: Legal Truths And Felonious Fictions (8 credits)

This Learning Community joins literature about law, order, and crime with study of the constitutional standards for arrest, prosecution, and punishment as well as current policies on policing and criminality. Through this juxtaposition, students will gain a basic appreciation and understanding of what law and order is, and how it is portrayed in popular culture.

*Students should register for one of the following LC groupings: 

1) ENGL-168-LC, POLS-168-LC, LCIS-201-04, or 
2) ENGL-168-LC2, POLS-168-LC2, LCIS-201-06

ENGL-168-LC Crime Literature

Fash (3 credits) (ALA KCA)
ENGL-168-LC: TU 9:00 -10:50 am
ENGL-168-LC2: TU 1:00 – 2:50 pm 

Starting with the birth of detective fiction and ending with a recent novel about a policeman’s murder of a black man, this course traces cultural fantasies about crime and criminality. We will consider what the fantasies inherent in whodunits, thrillers, and other crime literature reveal about gender, race, objectivity, morality, and the fundamental soundness of our justice system.

POLS-168-LC The Criminal Justice System

Pechulis (3 credits)
POLS-168-LC: M 9:00 am – 10:50 am
POLS-168-LC2: M 1:00 – 2:50 pm

Following the crime literature class, we will explore the practice of criminal law and the constitutional issues that arise in arrest, prosecutions, and punishments. We will look at policing in the past and policing today, as well as examine the criminal justice system.

LCIS-201-04 Integrative Seminar: Crime and Punishment: Legal Truths and Felonious Fictions

Fash, Pechulis (2 credits)
LCIS-201-04: W 9:00 – 10:20 am
LCIS-201-06: W 11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Exploring novels, comics, movies, television shows, podcasts, and news articles, this class will illuminate how crime is narrated and sensationalized, and how legal procedures are misrepresented or undermined in popular media.

5. France and Its Cultural Legacy 8 credits)

The art world experienced a radical shift during the latter part of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Paris was at the center of this revolution as artists, musicians, and writers forged together new styles in the neighborhoods of Montmartre and Montparnasse. France and Its Cultural Legacy will explore the ways in which creators working in different disciplines influenced each other to bring about the birth of the modern world.

MUS-239-LC Music that Changed the World

Slowik (3 credits) (SH)
T 11:00 AM – 12:50 PM

Looking for new means of self-expression, musicians, artists and writers rejected traditional forms and methods of creativity in Paris at the turn of the 20th century. Our study includes these explosive new ways of creating music, art and literature that changed the world forever. Topics include Debussy, Impressionism, Ravel, musical influences of the exotic, Stravinsky and the Ballets Russes. Taught in English.

FREN-310M-LC Inside France: Studies in French Culture

Febles (3 credits) (GC)
M 9:00 – 10:50 AM

An in-depth exploration of the cultural history of France from the French Revolution to World War I with emphasis on Paris as the capital of the art and literary movements of the 19th century. Topics covered include the transformation of Paris during the Second Empire, Impressionism and its lasting effects on French culture, colonialism and representations of the exotic. Readings from Claire de Duras, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, and Apollinaire. Taught in English.

LCIS-201-05 Integrative Seminar: France and its Cultural Legacy

Slowik, Febles (2 credits)
W 9:00 – 10:20 AM

The integrative seminar will bring together music, art, and literature to illustrate how these different but related disciplines were in a constant dialogue throughout the 19th and 20th centuries in France. The seminar will include virtual visits to French museums (such as the Louvre and the Musée d’Orsay) and monuments (such as the Notre-Dame Cathedral). We will also attend virtual concerts and ballet performances produced by world-renowned Parisian venues (such as the Palais Garnier and the Paris Opera Ballet).