My Simmons

Learning Communities

1. NEWTON’S INSIGHTS: INTEGRATED PHYSICS AND CALCULUS (10 credits)

In these meetings we will use calculus to solve fundamental problems in physics, such as simple harmonic motion, planetary motion, and calculating moments of inertia. The insights we get from very real world physics also help to bolster our understanding of the fundamental calculus processes of differentiation and integration. The two subjects are intrinsically linked, and studying them together makes each one easier. **NOTE: This is a 10-credit Learning Community.

MATH-121-LC Calculus I

Margaret Menzin (4 credits) (QL KCA)
T/TH 9:00 – 10:50 AM

Prerequisite: MATH 120 or equivalent.

Covers integral calculus and applications to area, volume, etc., transcendental functions, techniques of integration, polar coordinates, and improper integrals.


PHYS-114-LC Fundamentals of Physics I (Lecture)

M/W 9:00 – 9:50 AM
P. Jason White (4 credits) (SCI KCA)

PHYS-114L-LC Fundamentals of Physics (Lab)

F 11:00 am – 1:50 pm
P. Jason White (credits N/A – lab section)

First course in Physics for science majors (calculus based). Concentrates on the subjects of mechanics: motion, mass, force, energy, momentum, and torque and static equilibrium. Additional material includes fluids and simple harmonic motion. Three hours of lecture, a one-hour, guided-inquiry learning session and a three hour lab per week.


LCIS-201-01 Integrative Seminar: Newton’s Insights

Menzin, White (2 credits)
F 9:00 – 10:20 AM

In this seminar we will use the abstraction of calculus to solve physics problems and reinforce our understanding of physics, and will use the physical insights of physics to bolster our understanding of calculus. It is not an accident that Newton invented freshman calculus in order to formulate freshman physics. Following in his footsteps, we will use each subject to support our understanding of the other.


2. SKILLS FOR BUSINESS SUCCESS (8 credits

This course focuses on the interfaces between organizational behavior and management accounting by taking a contemporary approach to understanding how people behave in organizations and the financial decision-making required to succeed. Topics covered include human behaviors within organizations, managerial problem-solving and decision-making, communication skills, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and break-even analysis. The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester-long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.

BUS-234-LC Organization Communication and Behavior

Erin DeCurtis (3 credits) (SH)
T 9:00 – 10:50

Organizational Behavior (OB) is the systematic study, and the careful application of knowledge about how people think and behave within organizations. In successful organizations, leaders competently manage and organize a complex system of personalities, talent, teamwork and resources to meet strategic objectives. This course takes a contemporary approach to the interdisciplinary study of human behavior within organizations. It combines social science and psychology theories with practical workplace applications in an analytical framework that explores individual, interpersonal, and system-wide dynamics. Throughout the semester you will gain insight into your strengths as an individual, team-member, and leader; identify areas for personal improvement; and hone your managerial problem-solving and decision-making skills.


ACCT-120-LC Managerial Accounting

Ray Pfeiffer (3 credits)
M 9:00 -10:50

Prerequisite: ACCT-110

This course focuses on the interfaces between organizational behavior and management accounting by taking a contemporary approach to understanding how people behave in organizations and the financial decision-making required to succeed. Topics covered include human behaviors within organizations, managerial problem-solving and decision-making, communication skills, budgeting, responsibility accounting, and break-even analysis. The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester-long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.


LCIS-201-02 Integrative Seminar: Skills for Business Success

DeCurtis, Pfeiffer (2 credits)
W 9:00 – 10:20

The integrative seminar utilizes the organizational skills, team project management, and communication skills gained in the organizational behavior course and the managerial accounting decision making skills gained in managerial accounting to develop a semester-long project to be presented in a “Shark Tank” setting.


3. CODING AND DIGITAL STORIES (8 credits)

This Learning Community takes an interdisciplinary approach to digital storytelling and introductory programming. Students work individually and in teams to produce an interactive story that will include elements such as short-form video documentaries or historical narratives, accompanying audio pieces, photography, and a story script – all based on solid storytelling techniques. Students will gain a foundation in coding basics using Python, which also serves as the entrance to Computer Science.

COMM-250-LC The Interactive Story

Kris Erickson (3 credits) (ALA)
TH 9:00 – 10:50 AM

In this course, students use digital media to create interactive stories in multiple spaces – both online and through engagement with urban space. Students will research a specific location-based story and create a set of multimedia narratives for the Internet that engages users in a walking tour.


CS-112-LC Introduction to Computer Science (Lecture)

T 9:00 – 10:50 AM
Amber Stubbs (3 credits) (SCI KCA)

CS-112L-LC Computer Lab

F 9:00 – 10:20 AM
Amber Stubbs

Students will learn basic skills in developing software applications: variables, decision and repetition structures, data structures and modular programming. They will also learn the basics of building web sites, including HTML, CSS, and responsive web design.


LCIS-201-03 Coding and Digital Stories

Erickson, Stubbs (2 credits)
W 9:00 – 10:20 AM

Students will use skills learned in both courses to create a multimedia, location-based story with elements of adventure. Using lived experiences, storytelling techniques and basic media skills learned in The Interactive Story, combined with computer skills gained in Intro to Computer Science, students will develop an interactive walking tour.


4. RESISTING EXCLUSION (8 credits)

NOTE: This Learning Community has specific registration instructions below.

The course critically analyzes different strategies historically developed by the sociopolitical excluded to circumvent, mitigate. or nullify oppressive behaviors, policies, and ideologies imposed onto them. Through an in-depth examination of historical facts, current events, secondary literature, and creative literature from the United States and other countries such as Brazil and South Africa, students develop an understanding of different types of resistance, ranging from “hidden transcripts,” as classified by James C. Scott, to more open and destructive forms of resistance that include rioting, rebellion, and protest. Ultimately in the seminar, students weave the concepts, theories, and approaches learned from the politics of exclusion class with textual interpretation deriving from Literary studies.

POLS-215-LC The Politics of Exclusion

Abel Amado (3 credits) (SH)
T 3:30 – 5:20 PM

The course analyses race-based political exclusion in Brazil, United States, and South Africa. Topics to be covered include the historical evolution of racial and racist ideologies, the development of overtly racist regimes, and political processes that have sustained and buttressed race-based exclusionary politics. Additionally, the course examines changing patterns of incorporation of racial minorities, levels of representation, levels of political participation, the possibilities for coalition building between racial minority groups, and economic and social policy issues that affect minority and ethnic politics.


LTWR-193LC / WGST-193-LC Gender and Power

Fiona Maurissette (3 credits) (ALA)
M 3:30 – 5:50 PM

This class explores the writings and cultural contexts of literature by and about women from the 19th century to the present. Features novels, short stories, speeches, poems, and plays. Selected topics may include: education, friendship, sexuality, the marriage plot, labor, and protest and politics. This course features many types of literature including novels, short stories, poems, plays, and graphic novels. We will supplement this literature with media materials (short and long films, documentaries, social media texts) and non-fiction that helps us to think about gender in contemporary America.


LCIS-201-06 Resisting Exclusion

Amado, Maurissette (2 credits)
W 3:30 – 4:50 PM

The seminar critically analyzes from historical, comparative perspectives the various forms of resistance developed by excluded, marginalized, and minoritized groups. While case studies are drawn mostly from the United States, Brazil, and South Africa, examples from other regions are also included in the list. Each week, the seminar will focus on a particular form of resistance and students will use historical examples to critically examine the strategy developed by the oppressed.


REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR “RESISTING EXCLUSION”

For this LC, and this LC only, you will enroll by registering for the LCIS only:

  • LCIS-201-06 Resisting Exclusion (Amado, Maurissette) (2 credits)
    W 3:30 – 4:50 PM

Then you’ll be manually registered, by the Registrar, for the two disciplinary parts of the LC:

  • POLS-215-LC The Politics of Exclusion (Abel Amado) (3 credits) (SH)
    T 3:30 – 5:50 PM
  • LTWR-193-LC / WGST-193-LC Gender and Power (Fiona Maurissette) (3 credits) (ALA)
    M 3:30 – 5:50 PM

An Important Reminder

Make sure all three courses fit into your schedule.  While you will just register yourself for the LCIS, you must take all three parts of the LC. If you can’t be registered manually for the disciplinary parts of the LC due to schedule constraints, you will be removed from the LCIS.